SIMULATION

Webinar Registration

Sustainability Efforts in Healthcare Simulation and Clinical Learning

Wednesday, May 11, 2022 2:00 PM ET

Webinars are one hour in length. Space is limited.

Unable to attend live?

Register now and we’ll send you the link to the archived recording.

Presented By

Melissa A. Bathish PhD, RN, CPNP-PC

Clinical Assistant Professor and Clinical Learning Center
Co-Director
University of Michigan School of Nursing

Dr. Melissa A. Bathish is a Clinical Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Clinical Learning Center and Simulation Lab at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

Dr. Bathish received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree at the University of Michigan. She also received her Master of Science degree in the Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner/Clinical Nurse Specialist program and Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

She is a clinical educator and researcher focusing on simulation-based learning methods and technologies, specifically, environmental sustainability efforts in simulation education both nationally and globally and the development of innovative mixed reality technologies for skills and procedural training for nursing and medicine.

Dr. Bathish is a Healthcare Innovation Impact Program Fellow at the University of Michigan and chairs the International Nursing Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning simulation education Sustainability Special Interest Group.

Jessica E. Marsack PhD, RN, CMSRN

Clinical Assistant Professor
University of Michigan School of Nursing


Dr. Jessica Marsack is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. She received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degrees from the University of Michigan. She works clinically in adult internal medicine at Michigan Medicine, with an expertise specialty in providing peritoneal dialysis.

Dr. Marsack provides medical-surgical clinical instruction and education to undergraduate nursing students. Her research has focused on the effects of stigma and discrimination on various health outcomes for sexual and gender minority persons, and more recently on environmental sustainability efforts in simulation education.

She is committed to promoting initiatives for both of these topics, and has served on the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association’s nursing section and as a co-founder of the International Nursing Association of Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) simulation education Sustainability Special Interest Group.

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Wednesday, March 2, 2022
2:00 – 3:00 PM ET

Webinars are one hour in length. Space is limited.

Unable to attend live?

Register now and we’ll send you the link to the archived recording.

Texas A&M University Health Science Center

Benny Holland, Ph.D.

Assistant Dean of Clinical Affairs and Simulation
Columbia University School of Nursing

Session Overview

Healthcare contributes to sustainability challenges. Students learning new skills must use plastic supplies like the clinical setting, however, the accumulation of plastic waste in the simulated learning environment is extensive. In one semester, approximately 300 pounds of plastic intravenous tubing waste was accumulated in one nursing simulation education center. This project identified current sustainability practices of clinical simulation education centers in the United States.

Methods: An electronic survey was distributed to simulation-focused groups and associations from October 2020 through January 2021, resulting in 77 responses from 75 institutions.

Results: Policies regarding reuse and recycling of supplies were identified. Other aspects of sustainability such as supply procurement, supply disposal, and student education/involvement were lacking. Few simulation centers have formal plans for sustainability or carbon neutrality.

Conclusion: Simulation waste reduction will improve downstream population and planetary health but must be balanced with student learning needs. Given reduced infection concern compared to medical centers, simulation could provide an arena to pilot new sustainable procurement, reuse, & waste management policies before implementation in high stakes patient care settings.

Key Learning Objectives:
  1. Learner will understand the current sustainability practices of simulation education centers in the United States.
  2. Learner will recognize common barriers to sustainability efforts in simulation education.
  3. Learner will be able to identify opportunities for increased participation in simulation education sustainability efforts.

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Sponsored by:
The Global Institute for Simulation Training

The educational arm of
Education Management Solutions